Transformation&Education

Beethoven Apassionata interpretation and feelings

Last March I had an opportunity to attend a concert in Nicosia Cyprus of talented Pianist, 19 years old David Anastasiou performing among other composers Ludwig Van Beethoven “Appassionata”.

Appassionata was first published 1807 and was not “baptised” as such till after Beethoven death, by a publisher.

Known as most technically challenging piano sonatas Sonata 23 opus 57 gives the opportunity to performer, in this case David Anastasiou, to communicate his own powerful, volcano style, inner feelings with public.

We will leave technical details to music critics and will emphasize the feelings transmitted by David to us attending the concert. I strongly believe that feelings are more important than any technicalities.

David Anastasiou performance reminded me of the words written in fascinating Beethoven biography book I read in two days when teenager.

Those key words about Beethoven that are always in my mind since then are passion, improvisation, imagination, concern, love for life and fear combined with pain.

David Anastasiou managed to awake all of those and bring Beethoven back to us, the lucky ones attending the concert.

As 19 years old, and I can call him Pianist, David presented him self as knowledgeable, technically advanced Pianist, ready to improvise and, secretly, give his own touch to Apassionata! David definitely believes in himself and his ability to perform.

What philosophyofgoodnews noticed, actually felt, is that we were witnessing not a performer, interpreter in making but a birth of a composer.

Authenticity in his movements followed by imagination and improvisation and strong belief in him self made me make a bet that David will compose and compose big.

Ludwig van Beethoven said “Don’t only practice your art, but force your way into its secrets, for it and knowledge can raise men to the divine.” David is taking those steps and we wish him wholeheartedly all the success.

In the meantime David enrolled at Royal Conservatoire of Scotland with full scholarship , meeting somewhere there the soul of Beethoven and Chopin.

Philosophy of good news

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